Beauty · body · Health · self-care · Uncategorized

A Busty Girls Guide to Boobs – Fitting

As a very busty (42K) lady, I know the importance of a good bra. It’s important to strap the girls in to a bra that fits properly. So many people wear the wrong size bra, which not only affects the appearance of your breasts (quad boobs??) but it can also cause real issues. If your bra hurts, digs in, pulls on your shoulders, tries to impale your tits with its underwire, causes bulging or gapes etc, then your current bra is not for you.

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Wearing a poor fitting bra can cause a number of issues. Backache, sore shoulders, neck pain, headache, trouble breathing, skin conditions (man, fungal infections on your underboobs are a thing and they are NOT FUN), circulation problems, stress on muscles and bones, and probably some other stuff too.

Health issues aren’t the only problems a poorly fitting bra can cause. A rubbish bra can throw off your posture, but also make you look a bit… weird. Quad boob, saggy boobs, looking bulky, broader or just strange. A well fitting bra can change your entire silhouette, as well as ease any discomfort and pain.

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So? How do you know if your bra would be better off as a bird feeder? Here are some ways to tell if it is too small:

  • Thy cup runneth over/you get quad boob – your cups are too small.
  • The band digs in – you need a larger band size! A bra should be tight but it shouldn’t be digging in like the string on your Sunday pork roast.
  • The wire wants to impale you – usually this is due to cups being too small.
  • The shoulder straps cut in – this can be down to small cups, but sometimes the band can be an issue too.
  • The centre gore doesn’t want to nestle in to your bossom – if the wire is pushed away from your body, the cups are too small. The wire should not be sitting on top of any breast tissue!

What about if it is too big? Well, there are ways to tell that too.

  • It’s riding up – this is pretty common. If the band is riding up your back, then it is too big. The band should stay horizontal the entire way around your body.
  • Your cups have room for snacks – if your cups gape, they are too big. However, most pairs of breasts are asymmetrical; if one is bigger than the other, you should fit to the bigger breast. Doing this can result in one cup gaping, in which case you can try another style bra, or use a fillet to even things out if you’re self-conscious. Generally, nobody else will be able to tell.
  • Your cups dimple or wrinkle – they’re too big!
  • The band is loose enough to use as a slingshot – you should be able to comfortably slide a finger under and around the band. If you can pull it more than 2 inches away from your body, then your band is too big.

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So, if the cups are small, size them up, if they’re big, go down a size. Same with the band, right? Well actually, it’s not quite that simple. Bra sizes are relative! A 40D will have the same cup volume as a 38C. This is called a sister size. If you go up a cup size, go down a band size; if you go up a band size, go down a cup size. So, if you have an issue with your bra fit, but feel it is minor, give your sister sizes a try first or try a different style of bra. Remember, fluctuating hormones can alter breast size, so be mindful of this when fitting. Swollen period boobs, anyone?

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If your bra is miles off, I highly recommend getting fitted by professional.

I hope this helps any tangled titties! This is by no means a professional or comprehensive guide. I’m just sharing my experiences as a plus sized, well endowed woman. If in doubt, go and get fitted.

P.S! If you’re wanting to check out a lingerie blogger who has a wealth of information as well as recommendations, I highly recommend checking out the beautiful George from Fuller Figure Fuller Bust.

All images in this post are stock images as I’m not comfortable with sharing my own undercrackers with the world.

disability · Health · Life · Reading · Uncategorized

Why Kindle is superior to the Paperback

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Ooo, that’s right, I said it, I went there! Kindle > Paperbacks.

For many moons, or well, just the one moon, technically, but, it’s been a while; people have argued that paperbacks are, and will always be superior when compared to the sinful e-book. Okay, so I’ll admit, I hands down prefer having a physical form of book, the delight of a paperback in my hands, over my e-reader. There’s the weight, the feel of the pages, the sound when you turn them, that book smell and just… there’s a beauty to it, I’m sure you know what I mean. However, my Kindle is far superior – for some reasons, you may not have even considered.

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There are some obvious perks to an e-reader. They save space, they allow you to take an entire library while traveling while occupying only a sliver of the space, e-books are often cheaper, have 99p/introductory offers or some are even free. There are also some less obvious perks. After discussing this with numerous friends, they admitted they’d not really thought about them.

One word. Accessibility. Yeah, paperbacks are great. When was the last time you saw a large print version of a new release by your favourite author? That’s right. Large print books are often more expensive and have far less variety and availability compared to a standard print edition. An e-reader eliminates this worry because not only can a kindle books font size be increased, but the font can be changed to one of a variety that a visually impaired person may find easier to view and at no further cost to them.

Speaking of fonts; what about Dyslexia? Some dyslexic people find it very difficult to try and read a book. An e-reader helps in many ways. As well as being able to adjust the font size, margins and line spacing can be adjusted to change the format of a page which someone with dyslexia, cognitive dysfunction, a learning disability or other impairment may find incredibly beneficial. As well as this, I can’t speak for other e-readers, but the newer versions of Kindle have a font available called OpenDyslexic. This is a special font that adds weight to the bottom of lettering in an attempt to help ease some of the difficulties someone with dyslexia may experience while trying to read.

All these options make reading more accessible to those who may not ordinarily be able to read, or experience great difficulty in doing so. I adore reading, there is nothing like diving in to a book and immersing yourself in an entirely different world, but when your brain isn’t keeping up, it can be really difficult. Okay, so it’s not traditional and it doesn’t have the same charm as a paperback, but what’s the point in all that charm if you can’t enjoy it?

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So, reconsider an e-reader. Users of e-readers may love books just as much as you do, maybe even more so. If you love books that much, surely you want as many people as possible to enjoy the books you love. If an e-reader helps them do that, then surely that’s a wonderful thing?

What do you think? Do you use an e-reader? Physical books only? Have I changed how you perceive e-readers? I’d love to hear your thoughts!

Health · Uncategorized

Cervical Comb-over

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So, I had my very first smear test, or cervical cancer screening test. Yeah, it was weird and I decided I wanted to share the experience with you, start to finish, because I know many young women are apprehensive about having the procedure.

So, first thing is first. Booking the test? Well, you get a letter in the post. I got mine earlier on in the year, even though I was still 24. I kept putting off booking my test because I needed to see a nurse for bloods and a pill check as well anyway. I decided I would do it when I got back from a trip away. I actually got a second letter, this one had a leaflet with more information about the procedure, what happens afterwards, and requirements prior. You start getting invited around the age of 25. It is worth noting that you do NOT have to have the test if you don’t want to. It’s ultimately your decision, but please don’t use embarrassment or anxiousness as a reason to avoid it.

To book the procedure, you just call up and book in with the nurse once you’ve had the invite – the letter does tell you all this, but I’ll tell my experience regardless so you know what you can expect. Now, when I booked in, the receptionist didn’t actually tell me about the things you need to do before-hand (or rather, the things you need to NOT do). They ask that you book the test for the middle of your cycle, basically, it’s better if you’re not on your period for the test as they can get a clearer reading. They also say to not have a bath the day before and to avoid sex the night before – specifically to not use spermicide, lube or a barrier method of contraception. It’s probably just better to avoid it all together to save having to maybe need the test re-doing. If the sample is inadequate, they will call you back in three months time to take another sample. The test itself? The only thing you need to do is undress your lower half. If you wear a lose skirt, you can keep that on. The test itself only takes a few minutes.

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The nurse will ask you to lay down on the bed – I was given some of that paper stuff to put over my lap. You go spread-eagle and she (or he! you can request that a female perform the test when booking if you’re concerned) will insert a lubed up, scary looking contraption in to your fanjo. It’s called a speculum and it’s not actually scary. This basically dilates your vagina, opening it up so the nurse can see the cervix. Then she uses a little brush like pictured above to swab some cells from the cervix. This is what is sent off for testing. For me, the opening of the speculum was uncomfortable, a little painful in fact. The tenser you are, the harder it is for them to get on up there but if you’re anxious, tell your nurse. If it hurts, tell your nurse. They’re happy to take their time or to stop if you need it. It only takes a moment to collect the cells. While the speculum itself was weird and uncomfortable for me, I honestly couldn’t feel the brush. I dunno if it was because I was focused on the fact there was this woman all up in my junk and the pressure kinda made me feel like I need the loo or if it’s something you genuinely can’t feel but that was it. Brushy brushy, then she gets on out of there and you can put your junk away.The nurse advises that I may experience some spotting later on and if it happens, to not be concerned. Personally, I didn’t get any, but my ladyparts did feel a little weird for a while.

A little embarrassing? Perhaps, but it’s worth it to monitor your cervical health and potentially reduce the risk of cervical cancer.

Once the sample is taken, you will get a letter back after about two weeks with the results. If the sample was adequate and completely clear, you’ll get called back again in three years. If the sample was not adequate, you will get recalled in a few months – there are loads of reasons the sample might not be adequate so don’t worry about it. Anything else? They’ll tell you in the letter what will happen. I’ve not had my results yet or anything so I cant really speak on that part.

If you want some more technical information, you can check out the NHS page on Cervical Screening. This post was a bit longer than intended but I hope it puts some of you at ease about the test.

Beauty · self-care · skincare · Uncategorized

Manuka Honey Masque by Vitamasques

Hurrah, my first ever review on my new blog. And you’re readi- wait, no, don’t leave, what are you doing?

Still here? Cool. Now let me talk to you about my favourite sheet masque in existence.

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I discovered this face mask thanks to Glossybox and I fell in love with it. Initially, I wasn’t overly excited by it as I’d never heard of the brand before and sheet masks usually are a terrible fit on my face. The holes in all the wrong places, y’know? I tried it, loved it. I’m a cheap git, so almost had a coronary when I saw they’re £3.99 per masque; but then a discount code from Glossybox turned up in my inbox and all was right in the world. Alright, maybe that’s an exaggeration, but I was pleased none the less and ordered myself a packet as well as one of their other masques to try.

So what is it? The Manuka Honey Masque by Vitamasques is a Korean sheet mask with triple layer technology to enhance the moisture content in the mask and help the skin absorb the goodies it holds inside. At the risk of being captain obvious, that would be extracts of Manuka Honey.

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The instructions say to apply the mask after having cleansed your face and to leave it on for 20 minutes. If you got the Glossybox this was featured in, the products all went together pretty nicely, in the case of my skin anyway. However, now I opt for a good buffing using Lush’s Ocean Salt scrub and my Magnitone brush before applying this mask.

Unlike every other sheet mask I’ve tried, this one was actually a decent shape and fit for my face – the holes were in the right places and everything, which is rare in my experience and masks usually require repeated re-jigging as they slide around as the time passes. After the 20 minutes were up, I wiped my face with the masques limp corpse before doing the suggested “patting” of the face afterwards. I hate the feel about ten minutes after though, so I tend to proceed to wipe my face off and apply my usual moisturiser. I found improvement to the texture of my skin and a more plump appearance thanks to the more intensive hydration than the level that my standard skincare regime provides. A much needed boost after good ol’ winter dryness!

The Manuka Honey Masques retail for £3.99 or you can buy a four pack.

Have you tried this facemask before? Had you heard of the brand prior to it being featured in a Glossybox?